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Friday, 5 September 2014

Full Super Moon Harvest September 2014 a cause for Gratitude and why is it Orange?!

Well our moon for September 2014 is currently waxing at 83% of her fullness at the time I write this and I can feel her energy ever building. I haven't been lucky enough to see her on the last few nights as it has been cloudy here in England so I'm hoping for a few clear nights as we reach the nights of her fullness. 

This September moon is the moon closest to the Pagan festival of Mabon. Therefore a lot of the names that have been given over time to this full moon are to do with the harvest that takes place around this time of year. Mabon is the second harvest in the Pagan wheel of the Year, we shall see the last one being the traditional one of Samhain or Halloween. Common names for the September moon therefore included Harvest Moon, Barley Moon and Corn Moon.

It is often thought that this harvest moon is a particularly orange colour, is there any truth or science behind this fact? When we see the moon rising it looks much larger to our eyes as we are seeing it against the background of other objects. Due to the fact that we are looking at the moon through a greater amount of atmospheric particles including pollution the moon will take on an orange or reddish tint. The atmosphere will scatter the blue particles but allow the red component of light to travel direct to our eyes. Thus we see a larger looking red/orange Harvest Moon rising in our skies on the evening of the September Full Moon. 

This September Harvest Moon is of course the third in the trio of Super moons that we will have seen in 2014, therefore it's orange glow will look even more spectacular as it will appear slightly larger.  It will not be as large as the Supermoon that occurred in August. That super moon was the largest of the year because the moon was the closest to us. Supermoon's can appear up to 14% brighter and 30% bigger. Supermoons occur because our moon does not follow a circular path around our earth, it follows an elliptical one. Therefore at its furthest away it is 405,000 km away, this is called an apogee, and at its nearest it is 363,000, this is called a perigree. When the time of the perigree aligns with a full or new moon it is called a super moonMuch more information on why Supermoon's occur and how they might affect us can be found here:What is a Supermoon 

Other names for the September Full Supermoon include Mulberry Moon, Leaf Fall Moon, Kindly Moon and Little Chestnut Moon.

The September Mabon moon is all about achieving balance in our lives. We are nearing the Autumn equinox. Look to any areas of your lives that feel our of kilter right now, what do you need to do to bring that balance back? This is also a time of Gratitude. It is a time when we say thank you to our Mother Earth. She has provided us with a lot over this past year asking for nothing in return, the least we can do is offer her our gratitude. It is up to you how you do this, you may like to get together with family and friends or simply spend some time in nature offering up your silent thanks to the Mother Earth that feeds us and keeps us alive.

Do you have a favourite for the September Mabon Moon? I'm going to go with Blackberry Moon this year as the blackberries are early and there are already so many of them in my garden..delicious!

Full Mabon Supermoon Harvest Moon blessings to you,

AstarteAlison


3 comments:

  1. I love your posts about the moon ;o) I will be sending out much gratitude ;o) Big Hugs and many blessings ;o)

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  2. Typically, my girlfriend and I would be going to the Full Moon ritual with our Pagan group but we're broke and can't make it over. I've actually been very disappointed in that but as I was reading your blog, I realized that Amanda (Skoora) and I don't have to go, we can have our own close to home. There's a beautiful little woodsy park that abuts the river. It would be my first ritual... So, if I get shy and shaky, it's just her who sees.

    I think I will probably go with Harvest Moon because the very word brings back so many fond memories of working in the big garden with my Parents and Grandparents. The family piano teacher (she taught my Grandma and my Dad and Aunt and later me to play) and friend of the family had a huge back yard that she let us use to plant a big garden. We just paid a little on her water bill and gave her part of what we grew and we grew a lot! If she were still alive and I was back in Kansas we would be harvesting quite a bit still from that Garden.

    Hope you are doing well! *hugs*

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